Friday, 11 October 2013

Ho, Ho, No – Santa-Free Winter Décor

Sometimes winter feels like little more than frozen gray slush piles and red fat suits. Winter décor can seem equally sparse or simply aimed at pleasing children. Many of us want to change up with the season, but without solely focusing on Christmas. You’ve already learned how to winterize your bedroom, but there are many ideas for the rest of the home.





























I’m forever wondering why winter-trimmings seem to mimic the outside world: trees, branches and ornaments artfully flocked with fake snow, shiny plastic icicles, themes in cool silvery tones and stark white. Unless you live in a climate that’s never seen a single snowflake, you’ll probably want to leave the cold weather outdoors.

Don’t be afraid to avoid the typical red and green overload. Sure, good tidings abound and Kris Kringle is the man of the hour, but there’s no need to go Griswold and turn your home into a shrine to goodol’ Saint Nick. I’ve always been wondering what those yard inflatable’s do with a power bill…

Warmth and comfort are the keys here. Plush carpeting becomes a snuggly focal point. If you’ve got hardwood or laminate flooring, consider a cozy area rug for the duration of the season. Plump pillows and soft throw blankets draped on your sofa and chairs are inviting for guests. Heavy drapes double as a form of insulation over frosty windows, so consider adding some padding to your window treatments.

Soft lighting schemes are one of the quickest ways to get cozy for winter. Candles are at the top of the list, but seriously, be careful. It’s little surprise that December is the number one month for candle fires starting in the home. White colored Christmas lights are a fun lighting choice year-round but obviously fit in best during the winter months. Outfit your accent lamps with lower wattage (or even yellow-y) bulbs for intimate, ambient lighting.

The internet must have been designed to give us inspiration for fun crafting projects. Wreaths and garlands featuring natural elements like evergreen boughs and pine cones are a classic. Consider the myriad of decorative and ornamental uses for things like cranberries, acorns, cinnamon sticks, apples or whole cloves. Dried plants and flowers are seasonally accurate and look rustic. Potted bulbs, such as canna lilies, can brighten the mood.
































If you’re lucky enough to have a fireplace, let it be your centerpiece during winter. Wood burning fireplaces are ideal, and a pain, so don’t rule out the fake kind – there are portable gas and electric versions available for any home. Even if you just have a mantle without a fireplace, consider throwing a couple candles in there to highlight it.

Jonathon Ensor is a freelance design blogger for Empire Today. He prefers a Solstice bonfire to Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and, as a result, expects to find coal in his stocking.

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